Glossary

When you interact with DriveTest, you may encounter terms specific to obtaining your Ontario driver’s licence. 

DriveTest Terms

Approved translator:

A translator or interpreter allowed by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (MTO) to assist in the driver’s licence application process.  In the north and southwest regions of Ontario, an approved translator must be employed (or have been employed) in interpreter services, be a member (or have been a member) of a professional association that provides interpreter services, or be an experienced interpreter who is a member of the clergy. For the central, Greater Toronto Area (GTA), and eastern regions of Ontario, approved translators must be members of a provincial association that provides accreditation or certification or be accredited by a provincial or federal government.

Beginner Driver Education course (BDE):

A training course that is offered by an Ontario driving school to new drivers of passenger vehicles and that is regulated by MTO. A BDE school is eligible to deliver BDE courses only once they have received a licence from MTO. The classroom and in-vehicle training segments of an MTO-approved BDE course consists of a minimum of 20 hours in-class, 10 hours in-vehicle, and 10 hours of flexible instruction.

Back-to-back booking: 

See block booking.

Block booking: 

A type of booking method offered to commercial (truck and bus) training schools. A block booking enables a commercial training school to schedule multiple students for road tests on the same day, as they often share a vehicle for the test.

Check-in kiosk:

A piece of equipment used by DriveTest Centre visitors. This self-serve, touch-screen kiosk enables DriveTest customers to indicate the reason for their visit and puts them in the right queue to speak with a qualified customer service agent or driver examiner. May also be referred to as Qmatic, which is the manufacturer of the equipment.

Circle check:

A type of daily vehicle inspection conducted before getting behind the wheel. The circle check is also known as a pre-trip inspection. The circle check is a requirement of the Highway Traffic Act. Drivers must, by law, inspect their vehicles and be capable of determining whether they are in a safe operating condition.

City test:

A nickname for a type of road test for driver’s licence applicants. This test may also be called the Class G2 road test or the G1 exit. The city test is the level one road test taken to obtain a Class G2 driver’s licence. The preferred term used on this website is the Class G2 road test.

Class A:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any tractor-trailer or combination of motor vehicle and towed vehicles where the towed vehicles exceed a total gross weight of 4,600 kilograms.

Class B:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any school-purposes bus with a designated seating capacity of more than 24 passengers.

Class C:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any bus (except a school-purposes bus) having a designated seating capacity for more than 24 passengers.

Class D:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any motor vehicle exceeding 11,000 kilograms gross weight or registered gross weight or a combination of the above and towed vehicles not exceeding a total gross weight of 4,600 kilograms.

Class E:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any school-purposes bus having a designated seating capacity for no more than 24 passengers.

Class F:

A type of commercial driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any ambulance and bus with a designated seating capacity of not more than 24 passengers, except a school-purposes bus carrying passengers.

Class G:

A type of passenger vehicle driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any car, van, or small truck or any combination of Class G motor vehicle not exceeding a total gross weight or registered gross weight of 11,000 kilograms and where an accompanying towed vehicle does not exceed a total gross weight of 4,600 kilograms.

Class M:

A type of passenger vehicle driver’s licence that permits the driver to operate any motorcycle, limited-speed motorcycle, or motor-assisted bicycle, observing the highway access restrictions applicable to these vehicles as well as any motor vehicle in Class G1 and any combination of such a vehicle and towed vehicles (subject to Class G1 conditions).

Classified licence:

See commercial licence.

Commercial licence:  

A type of licence for vehicles that are used primarily for business purposes, for hauling goods, for emergency response, or for large groups of people. Class A, B, C, D, E, or F licences are all commercial licences. A commercial licence is sometimes referred to as a controlled licence or classified licence. The Highway Traffic Act defines a commercial motor vehicle as one having permanently attached thereto a truck or delivery body, such as ambulances, hearses, casket wagons, fire apparatus, buses, and tractors used for hauling purposes.

Controlled licence:

See commercial licence.

CVOR/NEEEP:

An abbreviation for the Commercial Vehicle Operator's Registration (CVOR)/New Entrant Education and Evaluation Program (NEEEP). A program administered by MTO for the owners/operators of trucks that have a registered gross weight of over 4,500 kilograms and/or buses that can carry ten or more passengers. The CVOR/NEEEP program requires owners/operators to apply for, obtain, and renew a CVOR certificate. To be eligible to receive a CVOR certificate, an applicant must demonstrate knowledge of Ontario’s safety laws and requirements under the Highway Traffic Act by completing the NEEEP testing at a DriveTest Centre.

Driver Certification Program (DCP) recognized authority:

A program through which certain organizations can obtain authority from MTO to test drivers, using a training program approved by MTO, for the purpose of upgrading or renewing commercial class licences and/or endorsements. Once an organization has successfully completed the application process and has been approved for the program, the organization is referred to as a recognized authority (RA). 

Enhanced Driver’s Licence (EDL):

A type of driver’s licence that is also an acceptable travel document for entry from Canada into the United States by land or water. The EDL is issued by a small number of ServiceOntario centres that offer EDL services to licensed Ontario drivers who apply for and meet all eligibility requirements. DriveTest Centres do not process EDL applications.

Exchange:  

A method of obtaining an Ontario driver’s licence for eligible applicants. Driver’s licences from other provinces in Canada, the United States, or other countries that have made reciprocal arrangements with the province can be exchanged for an equivalent Ontario driver’s licence. Certain conditions apply.

French-designated centre:

A DriveTest Centre that offers services in both English and French. These centres are assigned according to the French Language Services Act (FLSA) map of designated areas for Ontario.

G1 exit:

A type of road test for driver’s licence applicants. The Class G1 exit road test is the level one road test that a driver must pass in order to obtain their Class G2 licence. The G1 exit road test is also commonly referred to as the city test or the Class G2 road test. The preferred term used on this website is the Class G2 road test.

G2 exit:

A type of road test for driver’s licence applicants. The Class G2 exit is the level two road test that a driver must pass to obtain a full Class G licence in Ontario. The Class G2 road test is also commonly referred to as the highway test or the Class G road test. The preferred term on this website is Class G road test.

Graduated licensing program:

A program administered by the MTO that requires driver’s licence applicants to complete a two-tier licensing system to become a fully-licensed, independent driver.

Group Education Session (GES):

A 45-minute interactive session for senior drivers aged 80 years or over about new traffic laws, how aging affects driving, tips for older drivers, and road signs. Class G, M, and M(L) drivers aged 80 years and over must renew their licences every two years and meet all MTO requirements. One of these requirements is to complete a Group Education Session (GES).

Highway Traffic Act (HTA):

An Ontario government act, or collection of laws, that regulates the licensing of vehicles, classifies traffic offences, defines permit requirements, provides limits on loads and hauling, classifies vehicles, describes penalties, and provides specifications on other transport-related issues. See http://www.e-laws.gov.on.ca/html/statutes/english/elaws_statutes_90h08_e.htm for the actual act.

Highway test:

A nickname for a type of road test for driver’s licence applicants. The highway test is the level two road test that a driver must pass to obtain a full Class G licence in Ontario. This road test is also commonly referred to as the G2 exit or the Class G road test. The preferred term for a highway test on this website is Class G road test.

International driver’s licence (IDP):

An International Driving Permit, or IDP, is a special driver's licence that allows licensed motorists to drive in other countries without further tests or applications. DriveTest Centres do not process IDPs; you must contact the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) to apply for an IDP.

IVR:

An abbreviation for interactive voice response. A technology that enables people to perform tasks with (or interact with) a computer through the use of voice and/or a touchtone phone. At DriveTest, customers have the option of learning about or booking driver examinations via this website, in person at a DriveTest Centre, through the DriveTest call centre, or through an IVR.

Letter of authentication:

A customer-provided document that supports a foreign licence exchange application. 

Licence exchange:

See exchange.

Limited speed motorcycle (LSM):

A type of motorcycle to which the manufacturer has affixed a compliance label, as required by the Motor Vehicle Safety Act (Canada), that indicates the vehicle type as “LSM/MVL.” Typically, LSMs are gas powered, cannot go faster than 70 km/h, have a “step-through design,” and automatic transmission.

Medical examination report:

A report/form completed by a physician or nurse practitioner (registered nurse-extended class) to indicate a commercial driver’s licence applicant’s physical fitness to operate a vehicle. Applicants must produce a Medical Report (SR-LC-80) as evidence that they are medically fit to operate a class A, B, C, D, E, or F motor vehicle.

MTO:

An abbreviation for the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. The provincial government ministry responsible for roads and transportation infrastructure, vehicle and driver licensing, public transit, transportation policy, etc.

Non-commercial licence:

A type of licence for drivers of passenger vehicles that are not primarily used for business purposes. Class G and Class M licences are considered non-commercial licences.

Novice driver/novice licence:

A driver who holds a Class G1, G2, M1, or M2 driver’s licence.

Offsite testing location:  

An unmarked, approved DriveTest location used by some driver examiners on a part-time basis to administer road tests for applicants pursuing Class A, B, C, D, E, F, M, and/or Z driver’s licences.

ONR:

An abbreviation for out-of-country non-reciprocating. It refers to countries which Ontario does not have a reciprocal (exchange) agreement with.

Original driver/original licence:  

A type of driver’s licence. The term refers to applicants applying for their licence for the first time, foreign licence applicants (ONRs), and/or Ontario applicants who have let their licence expire for over one year. This term may also refer to the fact that all licences and ID presented at a DriveTest Centre must be the original – photocopies and faxes are not acceptable.

Out-of-country driver:

A driver from outside of Canada who is applying for an Ontario driver’s licence.

Out-of-order:

An outcome of a road test appointment as a result of an inappropriate vehicle or ill-prepared driver’s licence applicant. An applicant must provide a vehicle for the road test. If the applicant fails to bring a vehicle to the road test or the vehicle is not roadworthy or safe, an out-of-order is declared, and the road test is cancelled. If an out-of-order is declared, the applicant will lose 50% of their road test fee and will be required to pay the outstanding 50% to schedule another road test.

Out-of-province (OOP) driver:

A driver from a province, territory, or country other than Ontario who is applying for an Ontario driver’s licence. Ontario has reciprocal licence exchange agreements with all the other Canadian provinces and territories and several countries.

Passenger vehicle:

A vehicle in Class G or Class M that is typically used privately and for personal transportation. This type of vehicle is not typically used for hauling commercial goods or large groups of people. The term non-commercial vehicle may also be used to describe this vehicle type.

Practical test:

An outdoor test conducted in a parking lot to evaluate an applicant’s hands-on knowledge of air brakes. Successful completion of a knowledge test and a practical test will allow a driver’s licence applicant to legally drive a vehicle with air brakes and receive a Z endorsement on their licence.

Pre-trip inspection: 

See circle check.

Public test/public booking:

A road test booked by an individual (opposed to a driving school). The term is used on the DriveTest website to differentiate road test appointments booked by individuals from those booked by commercial (truck and bus) training schools.

Qmatic:

See check-in kiosk.

Reciprocating jurisdiction:

A country, state, province, or territory that has made arrangements with the province such that residents of that jurisdiction can exchange their original driver’s licence for an Ontario driver’s licence, provided that certain requirements are met.

Renewal:

A process that may involve demonstrating  driving skill and/or knowledge, showing proof of eligibility and/or physical fitness, providing identification, and paying fees periodically to remain a licensed driver in Ontario. All fully licensed drivers are required to renew their licence. Renewal cycles are based on age and class of licence held. Renewable licences can be renewed up to one year following the date of expiry.

Road test:

A type of hands-on examination that takes place in a vehicle, on the streets, roads, and expressways surrounding the DriveTest Centre. Driver’s licence applicants provide a vehicle and a driver examiner rides in the vehicle (or follow behind, in the case of motorcycles) to observe and evaluate the applicant’s driving skill.

Serco:

Serco is a service delivery company that specializes in delivering essential services on behalf of local and national governments and companies around the world. Serco Canada delivers driver examination services to Ontarians on behalf of the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.

Service disruption: 

A brief interruption in service provision at a DriveTest Centre, usually as a result of extreme weather conditions, emergencies, major construction projects, etc. Service disruptions may have an impact on scheduled road test appointments.

ServiceOntario:

A government agency that delivers services to the public on behalf of MTO and other ministries. ServiceOntario delivers driver and vehicle licensing services throughout the province, but they generally do not administer driver examinations (except for the College Park location in Toronto, which offers knowledge tests for driver’s licence applicants).

SGT:

An abbreviation for security guard testing. SGT is the nickname for a licensing program administered by the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS) for security guards, private investigators, bouncers, bodyguards, loss prevention personnel, etc. SGT examinations take place occasionally at DriveTest Centres.

Standby road test:  

An unscheduled, unbooked road test. Most road test appointments are booked in advance. However, when driver examiner schedules allow, DriveTest Centres offer road tests on a walk-in, standby, first-come-first-served basis. Whenever possible, we encourage driver’s licence applicants to book an appointment in advance to avoid disappointment, as standby road test appointments are not always immediately available.

Temporary driver’s licence (TDL):  

A document printed and issued at a DriveTest Centre or ServiceOntario office that can be used to drive legally for up to 90 days. A TDL serves as a driver's licence until the driver receives the permanent driver's licence in the mail or until the TDL expires, whichever comes first.

Travel point: 

A part-time DriveTest Centre designed to offer driver examination services to a smaller community from a shared, locally well-known facility, such as a community centre or town hall.

Valid licence:

A driver’s licence that is not expired, cancelled, or under suspension.

Verbal test:

A means by which a driver’s licence applicant can complete a knowledge test. Verbal tests are available by appointment only to applicants who cannot read and/or write in any language in which the knowledge test is available. Computerized knowledge test kiosks with audio features are also available.

Vulnerable sector check (VSC):

A process that verifies whether an individual has a criminal record, as well as any record suspensions (formerly pardons) for sexual offences and local police records for information relevant to the VSC. Applicants applying for a driving instructor’s licence must obtain a cleared VSC before a driving instructor’s licence will be issued.

X condition:

A code on a driver’s licence that indicates that a driver must wear glasses or contact lenses to operate a motor vehicle.

Z endorsement:

A code on a driver’s licence that indicates that a driver is authorized to operate a vehicle equipped with air brakes.